What Is Zoning?

Envisioning Development

What Is Zoning?

Draw the line!

Technical Assistance

Draw the line!

Are You Ready for a Ruckus?

Urban Investigations

Are You Ready for a Ruckus?

If You Can Make It Here...

Urban Investigations

If You Can Make It Here...

What Up With DAT?

Technical Assistance

What Up With DAT?

The Who in the Q!

Urban Investigations

The Who in the Q!

Meet the designers: WeShouldDoItAll

Meet the designers: WeShouldDoItAll

As part of a new feature on CUP collaborators, we asked Jonathan Jackson and Sarah Nelson Jackson from WeShouldDoItAll, a New York City-based design team, to tell us a little bit more about themselves and their thoughts on working on a CUP project.

They worked with us and community partner Resilience Advocacy Project on the latest Making Policy Public project, Child Support?!, available here.

1. Can you tell us a little bit more about WeShouldDoItAll? When did you become a firm? How did you start doing design work?

Our name, WeShouldDoItAll (WSDIA), is simply an intention. We feel designers should not be constrained to a singular expertise. To survive and excel within the creative realm, it is essential to know there is no single, absolute solution to any given problem. To immerse oneself in different avenues allows consideration of the otherwise unconsidered. It’s this method of working that excites and serves to drive our studio’s practice.

JJ: I graduated from Kent State University with a degree in Architecture. Prior to founding WSDIA in 2004, I worked for architects Archea in Italy, Archi-Tectonics/Winka Dubbeldam, and Lindy Roy in New York. I felt hindered by the drawn-out pace of architecture, and began doing more graphic projects, eventually primarily focused on that kind of work.

SJ: I graduated with a BFA from Boston University. My background in Graphic Design and Art History transitioned to an obsession with typography, website interaction, and understanding through visual arts.

2. How would you describe your practice?

WSDIA is a contemporary design studio that translates clients’ needs into dynamic, visual systems that can be presented at multiple scales. These solutions take the form of branding, spatial, environmental, interactive, or print projects. We oscillate between accomplished commercial clients, established public institutions, social impact initiatives, and the more off-centre and boutique—allowing us to preserve our dynamic nature and avoid getting locked into a singular area of expertise or client type. This provides an edge that we apply to all challenges, as different industries are constantly overlapping and inspiring one another.

3. What projects is WSDIA working on now?

We’re currently wrapping up two retail projects for Nike, that unfortunately we can’t talk about just yet. We’re also in the midst of branding a casting and production agency here in NYC, finalizing the refreshed brand and web presence for ESPN International Marketing Solutions, as well completing the design and production of a book for the AIA’s Small Project Awards.

4. What was the most exciting part of working on the Child Support?! project?

Meeting and conversing with the fathers was the most exciting and rewarding part of the project. We really enjoyed getting to know them a bit and hearing their stories.

5. What was the most important thing you learned from the project?

Learning about this complex issue, and realizing this poster could truly help young fathers better understand the process. Ultimately, knowing that our efforts would have an impact.

6. What is your secret skill that has nothing to do with your design work?

SJ: Jonathan’s defensive skills on the basketball court. He’ll lock you up!

JJ: Sarah’s a magician in the kitchen. She can throw down!

Mean Streets

City Studies

Mean Streets

Power Trip

Urban Investigations

Power Trip

Meet the Gun Laws

City Studies

Meet the Gun Laws

Are You Ready for a Ruckus?

Urban Investigations

Are You Ready for a Ruckus?

Lotto Zone

Urban Investigations

Lotto Zone

What Up With DAT?

Technical Assistance

Welcome to Health Care!

Making Policy Public

Welcome to Health Care!

Social Security Risk Machine

Making Policy Public

Social Security Risk Machine