Ready, Set, Apply!

Technical Assistance

Ready, Set, Apply!

What Is Zoning?

Envisioning Development

What Is Zoning?

Air Fair?

City Studies

Air Fair?

Store Stories

City Studies

Store Stories

Voice Recognition

Urban Investigations

Voice Recognition

Rent Regulation Rights - San Francisco Edition

Making Policy Public

Rent Regulation Rights - San Francisco Edition

We must acknowledge and make space for our students’ emotional lives. And for students that want to take action, we must support their development as effective change makers. This week we’re highlighting resources recommended by our Youth Education team that might be helpful for educators navigating how to process these events with their students. 

For educators looking to facilitate conversations about George Floyd’s death and the events that surround it, a good starting place could be this discussion guide, created by Facing History and Ourselves. 

The Movement for Black Lives has a great toolkit called the Week of Action in Defense of Black Lives, with downloadable resources and suggestions for civic actions organized by level of risk. Even though this week of action was planned for the week of June 1 through June 7, many of these activities can be adapted for your class community right now and can be done remotely.

At CUP, we often connect students with people directly impacted by the issues they’re learning about. This helps young people strengthen their personal understanding of the issues and can also empower them to action. Survived and Punished has a comprehensive toolkit for organizing letter-writing campaigns with people who are incarcerated. Students can leverage the skills, knowledge, and relationships they gain through letter-writing to get involved in campaigns to mobilize their communities.

If your students are directly protesting on the streets, make sure to prepare them as best as possible. Students should know how to protect themselves and know what their rights are when protesting.

Finally, many of the recent protests have highlighted the importance of supporting local bail funds. For anyone interested in understanding how New York’s bail system works, Who Makes Bail? is a CUP Youth Education project is a great entry point. You can also find other CUP student-made projects that explore how policing and the legal system impact youth HERE

Show Up

Public Access Design

Show Up

Innocent Until Proven Risky

Making Policy Public

Innocent Until Proven Risky

What Options Doc?

Urban Investigations

What Options Doc?

Bodega Down Bronx

Urban Investigations

Bodega Down Bronx

Get Support in Housing Court

Making Policy Public

Get Support in Housing Court

Weathering the Storm

Technical Assistance

Weathering the Storm

What Is Mandatory Inclusionary Housing?

Envisioning Development

What Is Mandatory Inclusionary Housing?

Rent Regulation Rights

Making Policy Public

Rent Regulation Rights